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sabato 15 luglio 2017

Nazioni Unite su: Business diritti umani e sostenibilità ambientale ... in sintonia con il Decreto Galletti ?

All'interno dell'ONU un suo comitato ha prodotto  (Ginevra, 30.6.2017) un documento importante: "il business e la dimensione dei diritti umani per uno sviluppo sostenibile: Integrare i principi di: Protezione, rispetto e recupero nella implementazione di obiettivi di sviluppo sostenibile.

Sotto c'è il link per il documento che sembra fatto per essere applicato alle EMF!
Sotto in questo post,  ci sono delle affermazioni essenziali, estrapolate dallo intero documento, quali:

- nello sviluppo di tecnologie e business si deve tener conto dei diritti umani (ad es. quelli delle persone elettrosensili per avere una vita ... civile) : se questi diritti non sono rispettati lo sviluppo non è sostenibile 
- lo Stato deve presidiare e deve protegere le persone che soffrono per abusi legati al business !
- lo Stato deve garantire che i propri partner lavorino secondo queste linee guida (e qui vedo un collegamento diretto al Decreto Galletti  )
- per il Business:  questo approccio non è scelta ma una precisa responsabilità; non basta finanziare progetti di filantropia ! Il rispetto dei diritti umani deve essere parte essenziale della 'catena del valore' della azienda. 





UN Working Group statement on business and human rights and sustainable development

Author: UN Working Group on business & human rights
"The business and human rights dimension of sustainable development: Embedding “Protect, Respect and Remedy” in SDGs implementation"
The 2030 Agenda [for Sustainable Development Goals] emphasizes that the business sector is a key partner for the United Nations and governments in achieving the SDGs. Notably goal 17 speaks of revitalizing global partnerships for sustainable development, including public-private partnerships. Paragraph 67 of the 2030 Agenda calls on “all businesses to apply their creativity and innovation to solving sustainable development challenges” and commits States to “foster a dynamic and wellfunctioning business sector, while protecting labour rights and environmental and health standards in accordance with international standards and agreements and other ongoing related initiatives, such as the Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights…”. 
...The UN Working Group on Business and Human Rights urges Governments to set a clear vision for connecting the role of the private sector and businesses in development with accountability and internationally agreed standards for business practices aligned with human rights. It also calls on business to meeting their responsibility to respect for human rights as an integral component of their contribution to the SDGs. The UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights should be a key reference point for both States and business in this context.

I. Embedding human rights in partnerships with business to achieve the SDGs Human rights are essential to achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Simply put, a development path in which human rights are not respected and protected cannot be sustainable, and would render the notion of sustainable development meaningless. Rightly, the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development is explicitly grounded in the UN Charter, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, international human rights and labour rights treaties and other instruments, stating that the aim of the SDGs is to “realize the human rights of all”. The SDGs themselves and their targets also cover a wide range of issues that mirror international human rights and labour standards. Many of the SDGs relate closely to economic, social and cultural rights, including rights focused on health, education, food, shelter, alongside the rights of specific groups such as women, children and indigenous peoples. In addition, SDG 16 on the need for peaceful, just and inclusive societies emphasizes key civil and political rights, including personal security, access to justice, and fundamental freedoms. The 2030 Agenda emphasizes that the business sector is a key partner for the United Nations and governments in achieving the SDGs. Notably goal 17 speaks of revitalizing global partnerships for sustainable development, including public-private partnerships. Paragraph 67 of the 2030 Agenda calls on “all businesses to apply their creativity and innovation to solving sustainable development challenges” and commits States to “foster a dynamic and wellfunctioning business sector, while protecting labour rights and environmental and health standards in accordance with international standards and agreements and other ongoing related initiatives, such as the Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights…”.

II. Reinforcing the State duty to protect rights-holders States have a critical role to play in ensuring that SDG implementation efforts are consistent with the human rights framework on which the 2030 Agenda is based. The State duty to protect people from business-related human rights abuse includes the task of ensuring that businesses will contribute to, not undermine, inclusive and sustainable development. The foundation of the State duty to protect as set out in the Guiding Principles requires States to protect against human rights abuse within their territory and/or jurisdiction by third parties, including business enterprises. This requires taking appropriate steps to prevent, investigate, punish and redress such abuse through effective policies, legislation, regulations and adjudication. It also requires States to set out clearly the expectation that all business enterprises domiciled in their territory and/or jurisdiction respect human rights throughout their operations. This implies having in place laws that require and enable business respect for human rights, and providing guidance to business enterprises on how to identify, prevent, and mitigate adverse human rights impacts linked to their operations. 

2. States must ensure that their business partners for sustainable development have made a clear and demonstrable commitment to the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights, and uphold these Principles in efforts to reach the SDGs. While partnerships with the business sector are a key part of the strategy for achieving the SDGs, States are responsible for setting national sustainable development policies and priorities to meet the SDG targets that they have committed to by 2030. As and when governments partner with business to achieve the SDGs, they must ensure that their partners have taken demonstrable steps to embed respect human rights across their operations. When seeking to engage business in pursuit of SDGs, States must at the same time emphasize that human rights – not profits – come first. Related to this, as States are beginning to encourage business to report on their contributions to the SDGs, they should also ensure that reporting frameworks are aligned with the Guiding Principles so that businesses disclose impacts to people across their activities and how negative impacts are being addressed. 

6. For business, the most powerful contribution to sustainable development is to embed respect for human rights across their value chains. And business respect for human rights is not a choice, it is a responsibility. The role of business in implementing the SDGs is different from, and goes beyond, traditional corporate social responsibility. Philanthropy or social enterprise are to be welcomed, but cannot substitute for meeting the responsibility to respect human rights, which all businesses regardless of size, sector or location, are expected to meet. Respecting human rights means avoiding adverse impacts on the human rights of others and addressing the adverse impacts with which the business is involved. Business implementation of the Guiding Principles is not simply about ensuring “do no harm”, or just a starting point towards making a positive contribution to sustainable development. Implementing the Guiding Principles in itself has tremendous potential to contribute towards positive change for the hundreds of millions of the poorest and most marginalized people across the world, for whom the term “sustainable development” would otherwise ring hollow. 

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